SC27 - Carriage of dangerous goods
06 Dec 2010
Yes
-  

 

 

STFC Safety Code 27

No

​​

 

Receipt and Despatch of Hazardous Substances

|Print PDF Version (PDF - 195Kb - opens in a new window)

PPT icon|Launch PowerPoint​ (PPT - 908Kb - opens in a new window)

Contents

Revisions

1
Initial launch
March 2010
1.1Minor change to ScopeMay 2011
1.2Further change to Scope and addition of Appendix 2
September 2011
1.3Amendments to audit checklistMay 2013
1.4
Add Document retention policy Appendix
August 2014
1.5
Changes to the transport by hand table to reflect De minimis exemptions.
January 2015
1.6
Inclusion of appendix 9, ‘Site Contingency Plans for Incidents/Accidents involved with the Transport of Radioactive Materials by Road’ and supporting references to it.
March 2016
​1.7
​Minor update to reflect the launch of SHE Assure and UKRI
​October 2018​
​1.8
​Update of IRR17 references and retention of training certificates
​June 2019

1. Purpose

The nature of work at the STFC involves the movement of a large number of hazardous substances, referred to in transport matters as Dangerous Goods. These are substances which can cause harm to the person, pose a fire hazard, can be explosive, or chemicals which would pollute the environment if released.

The STFC has a responsibility to ensure that any chemicals that leave its sites do so safely. This includes chemicals bought in by a third party as the STFC assumes partial liability for their safe transport when leaving STFC sites.

Under the provisions of the Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations (2009) any hazardous substances leaving any establishment should be packaged, labelled and transported in a manner appropriate to both the item in question and the method being used to transport it.

In addition the following directives define how hazardous substances should be packaged, labelled and transported when being sent by:

  • Road: European agreement concerning the international carriage of Dangerous Goods by road (ADR), updated and re-issued every two years;
  • Sea: International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code, updated and re-issued every two years; and
  • Air: International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations, updated and re-issued annually.

Where the materials being transported are radioactive the following regulations are also applicable:

  • International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA) Safety Standards Series, number 6 – Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material.

The aim of this code is to ensure that the transport of hazardous substances is carried out safely and in compliance with legislation.

2. Scope

The requirements of this code are mandatory across the STFC and apply to all staff, tenants, facility users, visitors and contractors, and apply in any instance when hazardous substances are being transported from or between STFC sites. This code applies to visitors and facility users transporting hazardous substances from STFC sites.

This code addresses the receipt and despatch of radioactive materials in small industrial type packages (e.g. Facility user samples). This code should be read in conjunction with the related radiation management codes including:

STFC Code 29, Management of Ionising Radiation Hazards at Work.

STFC Code 21, Management of Radioactive Waste.

STFC Code 28, Management of Radioactive Open Sources.

This code covers the basic transport arrangements for higher hazard radioactive items, such as type A and type B packages, but each case must be managed individually. Some may require a specific Certificates of Approval from the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) Transport Section, quality management plans, and transport contingency plans for the dispatch.​

This code does not apply to the transport of waste chemicals from the STFC sites by recognised waste contractors and to the transport of hazardous waste “created” by contractors working on the STFC’s behalf, although those carrying out these activities may need to seek the advice of the appointed DGSA.

This code does not apply to the movement of dangerous goods on STFC sites, though the packaging guidance given in Appendix 5 should be followed where ever possible, even for short journeys on foot.

This code does not apply to the dispatch of materials or equipment that are not classed as Dangerous Goods.

3. Definitions

3.1 Hazardous substance

A hazardous substance is one which possesses one or more of the following properties: flammable, harmful, toxic, is an irritant, is corrosive, is an oxidiser, is explosive, radioactive, carcinogenic, or is hazardous to the Environment.

3.2 Safety Data Sheet (SDS)

An SDS provides information on the hazards posed by a substance. It should be supplied with the substance in question by the manufacturer or supplier and will have 16 sections. Section 3 identifies whether the material is hazardous and contains hazard information, and Section 14 contains shipping information

For many experimental materials, which may be unique it is likely that no MSDS will exist, in these circumstances its hazards should be assessed by the DGSA or other suitably competent person.

3.3 Dangerous goods

Dangerous Goods are substances or articles, the carriage of which is either prohibited by the relevant transport regulations, or authorized only under conditions prescribed within the regulations. They are usually also hazardous substances. They are identified by a United Nations (UN) four digit number, for example UN1203 – Gasoline.

There are over 4000 UN numbers in use, many of which apply to groups or categories of materials with the same hazard, for example UN3182, Metal Hydrides, Flammable, N.O.S. (N.O.S. Stands for Not Otherwise Specified). For experimental materials many hazardous substances will not have a unique UN number.

3.4 Radioactive Substance (RS) Dispatcher

An appointed person trained to classify dangerous goods and check the suitability of packages/packaging for the transportation of those radioactive substances in the scope of this code (UN Class 7 materials). Each Site where radioactive materials are employed should have at least one RS Dispatcher to assist consignors in dispatching radioactive substances.

3.5 Logistics personnel

These are the employees who work in site Logistics teams dispatching and receipting packages.

3.6 Dangerous Goods Safety Adviser (DGSA)

An appointed person trained to provide advice to consignors on the correct classification of substances and undertake an annual audit of all dangerous goods shipment from STFC sites. Their legal role and training requirements are defined and listed in ADR 2015. Those DGSAs advising on radioactive material transport should have completed UN Class 7 training.

3.7 Radiation Protection Adviser (RPA)

This is the competent person who provides advice to the employers and consignors, on compliance with the Ionising Radiations Regulations 2017, including all aspects of dealing with Radioactive Materials, see Safety Code 29, Management of Ionising Radiation Hazards at Work.

These are the receptacles and any other components or materials necessary for the receptacle to perform a containment function. They will have been type tested under conditions, will be certified as such and will be marked with a code that identifies the type and maximum mass of goods they can be used to transport.

4 Responsibilities

4.1 Staff, tenants, facility users, visitors or consignors wishing to dispatch materials shall:
  • For dispatch through site logistics or directly:
  •  
  • 4.1.1 Where Dangerous Goods are being transported offsite by road, air, sea or rail via site logistics teams, complete a Dangerous Goods Dispatch pro forma, see Appendices 1 and 3. Including: the consignee name and address, a description of each item and its value, declaration that the substances are “Dangerous Goods” as determined by the SDS classification data. Where materials are radioactive dispatch procedures are more complex and the advice of the RS Dispatcher, UN Class 7 DGSA and RPA must be sought.
  •  
  • 4.1.2 Seek the advice of the DGSA where no SDS classification data is available to complete the Dangerous Goods Dispatch pro forma. Where materials are radioactive the advice of the RS Dispatcher, UN Class 7 DGSA and RPA must be sought.
  •  
  • 4.1.3 Where UN Class 7 radioactive materials are to be transported ensure, as appropriate, that specific Certificates of Approval from the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) Transport Section, quality management plans, and transport contingency plans for the dispatch are in place and implemented. Where a specialist and licenced carrier(s) is employed seek the advice of the RPA and UN Class 7 DGSA in selecting such a carrier(s), and ensure that the carrier’s transport contingency plans are suitable and sufficient and interface effectively with STFC radioactive material transport contingency plans, see appendix 9, and are consistent with the arrangements of the receipting location.
  •  
  • 4.1.4 Package the substances for safe transport to site logistics team, for example, sealed bottles for liquids, sealed containers for powders etc, and take it with the Dangerous Goods Dispatch pro forma detailing whether the materials are "Dangerous Goods", a copy of the SDS and any other supporting safety information to site logistics. See Appendix 5. Where materials are radioactive the advice of the RS Dispatcher, UN Class 7 DGSA and RPA must be sought.
  •  
  • 4.1.5 ​Retain a copy of the dispatch pro forma and all associated dispatch documentation. Where materials are radioactive the advice of the RS Dispatcher, UN Class 7 DGSA and RPA must be sought.​
  •  
  • For dispatch by hand - small quantities of some Dangerous Goods may be carried by hand, this is particularly relevant to facility users who bring samples to STFC sites for investigation and to STFC scientists who travel with samples to other sites.
  •  
  • 4.1.6 Where the goods are to be transported by hand, package the substances appropriately following the guidelines detailed in Appendices 4 and 5, ensuring that the UN number and Proper Shipping Name are recorded on the outer packaging, see Appendix 3.
  •  
  • 4.1.7 Radioactive materials must not be transported by hand.
  •  
  • 4.1.8 Seek advice from DGSA if you think a substance can be transported by hand due to its small quantity but help is needed to classify it.
  •  
  • 4.1.9 Where transporting dangerous goods by hand by air check in advance with the airline to ensure that the specific airline's procedures for packaging, labelling and documentation are addressed. These can be more stringent than regulatory requirements. Facility users in particular should ensure they are allowed to hand carry on their inward and outward journeys before their visit.
  •  
  • For intra-site movement:
  •  
  • 4.1.10 When arranging the movement of Dangerous Goods on STFC sites apply the same general principles given in 4.1.3 above.
4.2 Line Managers:
  • 4.2.1 Ensure that their group members are aware of: the need to transport Dangerous Goods/Hazardous substances according to the controls defined in this code; the DGSA; and as appropriate RPA and RS Dispatcher. See STFC SHE Directory (link opens in a new window).
    4.2.1 Ensure that their group members are aware of: the need to transport Dangerous Goods/Hazardous substances according to the controls defined in this code; the DGSA; and as appropriate RPA and RS Dispatcher.
4.3 Radiation Protection Advisers (RPAs) shall:
  • 4.3.1 Ensure that relevant DGSA, RS Dispatchers and logistics staff are aware of the need to transport radioactive substances in the manner defined in this code and provide advice with regard to such dispatches.
  •  
  • 4.3.2 Appoint an RS Dispatcher in writing (template appointment letter (Word document - 191kB - link opens in a new window)) for the site they advise informing logistics of their name and entering it into the STFC SHE Directory (link opens in a new window) ensuring that they have received appropriate training (see Appendix 6) and that their appointment is recorded in the STFC SHE Directory along with copies of training certificates.
    4.3.2 Appoint an RS Dispatcher in writing for the site they advise informing logistics of their name, ensuring that they have received appropriate training (see Appendix 6) and that their appointment is recorded in the STFC SHE Directory along with copies of training certificates.
4.4 Radioactive Substance (RS) Dispatchers shall:
  • 4.4.1 Undertake initial training in classifying Dangerous Goods, specifically UN Class 7 goods, and afterwards attend regular update sessions, see Appendix 6. Copies of certificates for completed training, formal qualifications and (where applicable) examination results should be supplied to SHE Group.
  •  
  • 4.4.2 Check and advise on all Dangerous Goods Dispatch pro formas relating to radioactive substances, reclassifying materials as appropriate, and provide advice on packaging.
  •  
  • 4.4.3 Seek further advice from the DGSA or RPA when they are unsure about classifying a particular radioactive material or when the hazards arising from transporting radioactive materials are high.
  •  
  • 4.4.4 Identify any high consequence Dangerous Goods and consult the DGSA and RPA regarding appropriate secure storage for radioactive substances.
4.5 Logistics Personnel shall:
  • 4.5.1 Prior to dispatch check the paperwork and packaging of all items brought to them as Dangerous Goods or Hazardous Substances, see Appendix 5, repackaging items in UN packaging if appropriate.
  •  
  • 4.5.2 Prepare the relevant documentation for transport, for example Shippers Declaration and/or Dangerous Goods Note (DGN) and/or Transport Emergency (TREM) card as required by the selected mode of transport.
  •  
  • 4.5.3 Arrange appropriate shipment of the item.
  •  
  • 4.5.4 Retain copies of the Dangerous Goods Dispatch pro forma showing the UN number, Class, Packing Group, Proper Shipping Name (PSN) and quantity of all the items they dispatch for a period of two years from dispatch.
  •  
  • 4.5.5 Upon receipt of Dangerous Goods, log their arrival, store them safely and securely in an appropriate lockable cabinet and inform the intended addressee.
4.6 Dangerous Goods Safety Advise​r shall:
  • 4.6.1 Undertake initial DGSA training and periodic re-training. Copies of certificates for completed training and examination results should be supplied to SHE Group.
  •  
  • 4.6.2 Advise on safety and security for Dangerous Goods movements where the potential consequences are high in the event of a transport related incident.
  •  
  • 4.6.3 On an annual basis, provide information on updates to Dangerous Goods transport legislation and training requirements to RS Dispatchers, management and logistics personnel. Initiate an update of this code as appropriate.
  •  
  • 4.6.4 Carry out regular safety compliance audits of Logistics, RS Dispatchers and the Dangerous Goods carriers used by their site ensuring that actions arising form the audit are completed in a timely manner.
  •  
  • 4.6.5 Collate annually all records from site RS Dispatchers and logistics, and use the information to produce an annual compliance report for the Site safety committee.
  •  
  • 4.6.6 Document and report the findings of compliance audits to STFC Health and Safety Management Committee annually.
4.7 Director Responsible for SHE shall:

Contact: Baker, Gareth (STFC,DL,CSD)